Abstract
ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF BACTERIAL AGENTS OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT AMONG HOSPITAL PATIENTS IN ASEER REGION, SAUDI ARABIA

Nusrat Jhan and Vedavalli Sachithananthan*

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an internationally recognized threat to health. Microbial resistance to antibiotics has increased alarmingly over recent decades prompting the world health organization to declare this is a global public health crisis. The contribution of primary healthcare is particularly important as this is where almost 80% of all antibiotics used within the health service are prescribed. Objectives: Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) is considered as one of the major public health problems and it is recognized as the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in many developing countries. The objectives of the study were to study the resistance of the bacteria causing upper respiratory tract infection to antimicrobial drugs in children. To study the type and frequency of antibiotic prescription for Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) without apparent bacterial infection. To investigate the type and frequency of antibiotic prescription for URTI without apparent bacterial infection in Aseer region based on both visits and facilities. Methods: Saudi Arabia has several challenges that can stimulate the emergence and spread of multi drug resistant bacteria. Cross-sectional analysis of the drug utilization study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of antibiotics use in Pediatric Hospital, in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. From a total of 200, subjects were analyzed, antibiotics were prescribed in 77% of these visits. Results: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen capable of causing respiratory infections. According to the table 5 of prevalence of antimicrobial susceptibility, the treatment of nosocomial infections by S. maltophilia is difficult, as this pathogen shows high levels of intrinsic or acquired resistance to different antimicrobial agents, drastically reducing the antibiotic options available for treatment. Amikacin (30 %), Gentamicin (35%), Ertapenem (44%), Imipenem (51%), Meropenem (37%), Cephalothin (54%) and Cefuroxime (48.6 %) show the highest resistance. Conclusion: In general, visits to physicians were more likely to result in an antibiotic prescription than visits to hospital outpatient clinics. Their increasing inappropriate consumption leads to the development of bacterial resistant strains. Such resistance to antibiotics is likely to lead to reduction in the effectiveness of many antibiotics.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Upper respiratory tract infection (URTIs) – pharyngotonsillitis – antibiotic resistance – microorganisms.


[Full Text Article]

Login





Forgot Password  |  Register

Indexing

Best Paper Awards

European Journal of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences (EJBPS) will give best paper award in every issue in the form of money along with certificate to promote research activity of scholar.

Best Article of current issue :

Tangudu Nagabhusana Rao

Download Article : Click here

News & Updation

  • OCTOBER ISSUE PUBLISHED

    OCTOBER 2018 Issue has been successfully launched on 1 October 2018

  • EJBPS New Impact Factor

    Its our Pleasure to Inform you that EJBPS Impact Factor has been increased from 4.382 to 4.918 due to high quality Publication at International Level.

  • Index Copernicus Value

    EJBPS Received Index Copernicus Value 77.3, due to High Quality Publication in EJBPS at International Level

  • Journal web site support Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, Saffari for easy download of article without any trouble.

    .

  • Article Invited for Publication

    Dear Researcher, Article Invited for Publication  in EJBPS coming Issue.

     

UG/PG/Ph.D Research Publication

Research Scholar of UG/PG/Ph.D can Submit their Research Article/Review Article/Case Study/Short Communication for Publication in EJBPS

Downloads

Copyright From

Covering Letter

                        Author Instruction 
 

PLAGERLUM REPORT